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Old 06-09-12, 07:01 AM   #1
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Default Mob attacks women at anti-sex assault rally

Mob attacks women at anti-sex assault rally in Egypt


Female Egyptian protesters chant anti military rulers slogans
during a demonstration at Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt Friday,
June 8, 2012. Arabic reads "May God take me before I giveup
their rights". A mob of hundreds of men assaulted women
holding a march demanding an end to sexual harassment in
the square.


A mob of hundreds of men assaulted women holding a march demanding an end to sexual harassment Friday, with the attackers overwhelming the male guardians and groping and molesting several of the female marchers in Cairo's Tahrir Square.
From the ferocity of the assault, some of the victims said it appeared to have been an organized attempt to drive women out of demonstrations and trample on the pro-democracy protest movement.
The attack follows smaller scale assaults on women this week in Tahrir, the epicenter of the uprising that forced Hosni Mubarak to step down last year. Thousands have been gathering in the square this week in protests over a variety of issues - mainly over worries that presidential elections this month will secure the continued rule by elements of Mubarak's regime backed by the ruling military.
Earlier in the week, an Associated Press reporter witnessed around 200 men assault a woman who eventually fainted before men trying to help could reach her.

Friday's march was called to demand an end to sexual assaults. Around 50 women participated, surrounded by a larger group of male supporters who joined to hands to form a protective ring around them. The protesters carried posters saying, "The people want to cut the hand of the sexual harasser," and chanted, "The Egyptian girl says it loudly, harassment is barbaric."
After the marchers entered a crowded corner of the square, a group of men waded into the women, heckling them and groping them. The male supporters tried to fend them off, and it turned into a melee involving a mob of hundreds.
The marchers tried to flee while the attackers chased them and male supporters tried to protect them. But the attackers persisted, cornering several women against a metal sidewalk railing, including an Associated Press reporter, shoving their hands down their clothes and trying to grab their bags. The male supporters fought back, swinging belts and fists and throwing water.
Eventually, the women were able to reach refuge in a nearby building with the mob still outside until they finally got out to safety.

"After what I saw and heard today. I am furious at so many things. Why beat a girl and strip her off? Why?" wrote Sally Zohney, one of the organizers of the event on Twitter.
The persistence of the attack raised the belief of many that it was intentional, though who orchestrated it was unclear.
Mariam Abdel-Shahid, a 25 year-old cinema student who took part in the march, said "sexual harassment will only take us backward."
"This is pressure on the woman to return home," she said.
Ahmed Mansour, a 22 year-old male medical student who took part in the march, said there are "people here trying to abuse the large number of women protesters who feel safe and secure. Some people think it is targeted to make women hate coming here."
"I am here to take a position and to object to this obscene act in society," he said.
Assaults on women Tahrir have been a demoralizing turn for Egypt's protest movement.

During the 18-day uprising against Mubarak last year, women say they briefly experienced a "new Egypt," with none of the harassment that is common in Cairo's streets taking place in Tahrir. Women participated in the anti-Mubarak uprising as leading activists, protesters, medics and even fighters to ward off attacks by security agents or affiliated thugs. They have continued the role during the frequent protests over the past 15 months against the military, which took power after Mubarak's fall on Feb. 11, 2011.
But women have also been targeted, both by mobs and by military and security forces in crackdowns, a practice commonly used by Mubarak security against protesters. Lara Logan, a U.S. correspondent for CBS television, was sexually assaulted by a frenzied mob in Tahrir on the day Mubarak stepped down, when hundreds of thousands of Egyptians came to the square to celebrate.
In a defining image of the post-Mubarak state violence against women, troops dispersing a December protest in Tahrir were captured on video stripping a woman's top off down to her blue bra and stomping with their boots on her chest, as other troops pulled her by the arms across the ground.
That incident prompted an unprecedented march by some 10,000 women through central Cairo in December demanding Egypt's ruling military step down in a show of outrage

In contrast, the small size of Friday's march could reflect the vulnerability and insecurity many feel in the square, which was packed with thousands of mostly young men by nightfall Friday. Twenty rights groups signed on to support the stand and hundreds more vowed to take part, according to the Facebook page where organizers publicized the event, but only around 50 women participated.

Sexual harassment of women, including against those who wear the Islamic headscarf or even cover their face, is common in the streets of Cairo. A 2008 report by the Egyptian Center for Women's Rights says two-thirds of women in Egypt experienced sexual harassment on a daily basis. A string of mass assaults on women in 2006 during the Muslim feast following the holy month of Ramadan prompted police to increase the number of patrols to combat it but legislation providing punishment was never passed.
After Friday's attack, many were already calling for another, much larger stand in the square against such assaults.
Another participant in Friday's march, Ahmed Hawary, said a close female friend of his was attacked by a mob of men in Tahrir Square in January. She was rushed off in an ambulance, which was the only way to get her out, he said. After suffering from a nervous breakdown, she left Cairo altogether to work elsewhere in Egypt.
"Women activists are at the core of the revolution," Hawary said. "They are the courage of this movement. If you break them, you break the spirit of the revolution."



http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-202_162-57449867/mob-attacks-women-at-anti-sex-assault-rally-in-egypt/
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Old 06-09-12, 07:07 AM   #2
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Wow, I was hoping today for "anything" to make me see some good in the world, but oh noooooooooooo

People, WTF
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Old 06-09-12, 07:18 AM   #3
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Does anything in the news these days really suprise any of us anymore? And what an unusual turn out to a protest. It was like a mass public raping.
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Old 06-09-12, 07:26 AM   #4
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I think I should stop reading the news lol
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Old 06-09-12, 07:32 AM   #5
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You are not kidding Steve, watching the news too. It's hard not to lose hope sometimes.
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Old 06-09-12, 07:37 AM   #6
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Not to try and be racist but I knew some Egyptian males who lived in Australia and believed they had the right to take what they desired, whether the female was interested or not...
One, if I EVER see him, I'll blow his f*&^$ng head off myself but, that's a whole different story.
YUP, too much violence in the world!
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Old 06-09-12, 08:15 AM   #7
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How did such a mighty civilisation like the Egyptians turn so terrible? Seriously..
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Old 06-09-12, 12:35 PM   #8
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Not to sound racist but I knew some Australian guys who lived over here and they were all racist!












..J/k :D
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Old 06-09-12, 02:13 PM   #9
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Quote: Originally Posted by Notorious_dog View Post
I'm not saying G is racist, but from my experience, Aussies are racially insensitive to the point that all other races think that they're being racist, but they're not actually racist. They just make jokes of other races and say nasty things about them on tv, and make fun of their accents, and alienate them in the streets, make them feel unwelcome and un-liked because they're different, and stuff like that, you know, just having good old fun at their expense. That's not racist?

You rasist
...why isn't the grass black? 'Cause It's Racist !

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Old 06-09-12, 02:13 PM   #10
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Quote:
A 2008 report by the Egyptian Center for Women's Rights says two-thirds of women in Egypt experienced sexual harassment on a daily basis.
That pretty much says it all.
Are they any worse than a lot of the other Arab nations though?
I very much doubt it.
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Old 06-09-12, 04:54 PM   #11
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Quote:
Not to sound racist but I knew some Australian guys who lived over here and they were all racist!
Nothing like many of the Brit's who live in Aus though, I bet!
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Old 06-09-12, 05:01 PM   #12
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Quote: Originally Posted by Gandolph13 View Post
Nothing like many of the Brit's who live in Aus though, I bet!
Racist Whales?

An albino whale calf swims near its mother in this aerial photo snapped high above the shorelines of the Cape, South Africa
Picture: Robert Harding / Barcroft Media
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Old 06-09-12, 05:48 PM   #13
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So I'm the only one who appreciates the irony?
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Old 06-09-12, 10:30 PM   #14
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Quote: Originally Posted by Gandolph13 View Post
Not to try and be racist but I knew some Egyptian males who lived in Australia and believed they had the right to take what they desired, whether the female was interested or not...
One, if I EVER see him, I'll blow his f*&^$ng head off myself but, that's a whole different story.
YUP, too much violence in the world!
And you're not. In the news of the last months you can find the evidence that Egypt is indeed being plagued by a constant wave of sexual harrasment. And this was already going on long before the arab spring. So one could conclude if that is the way how things are done in the country, it isn't that surprising that one fellow Egyptian migrant takes those 'manners' along with him.
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